Algonquin Park's Five Major Habitats
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Algonquin Park's Five Major Habitats
   
 

Algonquin Park is covered by five major habitat types. The vegetation in these habitats has evolved over the past 11,000 years since huge glaciers, which once covered the entire Park, melted. With the melting of these glaciers, Algonquin Park has become home to a rich blend of plant and animal species since it is located in an geographic area called a transition zone where both northern and southern species mix.

This section describes Algonquin Park's five major habitats and their characteristics.

Deciduous Forest
The deciduous forest (hardwood forest) is the dominant habitat in Algonquin Park. Covering approximately the western two-thirds of the Park, the deciduous forest is defined by poorly-sorted soils called till that retains water for a long period of time.
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Coniferous Forest
When the glaciers melted about 11 000 years ago, meltwaters formed large rivers that flowed from the higher elevations. These rivers deposited sand and gravel primarily on the east side of Algonquin Park.
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Spruce Bogs
Spruce bogs are a northern type of habitat found in Algonquin Park. They are successional habitats between small bodies of water and forests.
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Beaver Ponds
Beaver ponds would not be present in Algonquin Park if it were not for the Beaver. Other than man, the beaver is the only animal in Algonquin Park to dramatically modify its environment in order to meet its needs.
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Lakes and Rivers
Algonquin Park is covered with over 2000 named lakes, comprising about 10% of the total area of the Park. This number of lakes may not seem impressive but any Algonquin hiker or canoeist knows that you don't have to travel very far in Algonquin to find water.
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